Decennial Census

The U.S. Census counts every resident in the United States. It is mandated by Article I, Section 2 of the Constitution and takes place every 10 years.  The data collected by the decennial census determine the number of seats each state has in the U.S. House of Representatives and is also used to distribute billions in federal funds to local communities.

Staff assists with preparation for and promotion of the decennial Census, and compiles, maintains and monitors current and historical Census data at various geographic levels for the five-county Bi-State Region, states of Illinois and Iowa, and the Nation.  Users can access this data on our Data Portal, GreaterQCRegionData.org.  Or, to access multiple data sets and/or multiple geographies within the Nation, such as census blocks, tracts, voting districts, cities, counties and school districts, visit the Census’ American Factfinder: http://factfinder2.census.gov.

For more information visit http://www.census.gov/history/www/programs/demographic/decennial_census.html or contact our Data Services Staff.

2010 Census Demographic Profile Summaries (DP-1) for each county and municipality in the Region are also available.

2000 Census Demographic Profile Summaries (DP-1) for each county and municipality in the Region are also available.

American Community Survey

The American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing survey that provides data every year -- giving communities the current information they need to plan investments and services. Information from the survey generates data that help determine how more than $400 billion in federal and state funds are distributed each year.

Data services staff are well-versed in the wealth of the American Community Survey data available and monitors a large store of ACS data describing the socioeconomic characteristics of the Region (or any part within).  Popular data requests include population, race and ethnicity, ancestry, age, sex, family, housing, income, poverty, education, language, commuting to work, employment, veterans status. Our Data Portal, GreaterQCRegionData.org also has data for the five-county Bi-State Region, States of Illinois and Iowa, and the Nation.  Or, to access multiple data sets and/or multiple geographies within the Nation, such as census blocks, tracts, voting districts, cities, counties and school districts, visit the Census’ American Factfinder: http://factfinder2.census.gov.
For additional information on the ACS, please contact our Data Services Staff.

Guidance for ACS Data Users
Three tips for using American Community Survey (ACS) data

1.    The 2010 Census shows the number of people who live in the U.S. and the American Community Survey shows how people live.
•    Use data from the American Community Survey to obtain demographic, social, economic, and housing characteristics.
•    Use numbers from the 2010 Census to obtain counts of the population and their basic characteristics (sex, age, race, Hispanic origin, and homeowner status).
•    Use data from the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program in the years between censuses. The Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program produces official population estimates for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns, plus housing unit estimates for states and counties.

2.    All American Community Survey data are estimates.
•    The Census Bureau collects American Community Survey data from a sample of the population in the United States and Puerto Rico--rather than from the whole population. All ACS data are survey estimates. To help you interpret the reliability of the estimate, the Census Bureau publishes a margin of error (MOE) for every ACS estimate.
    
3.    American Community Survey collects and releases data by the calendar year for geographic areas that meet specific population thresholds as follows:
•    Populations of 65,000 +        ACS 1-year estimates
•    Populations of 20,000 +        ACS 3-year estimates
•    Populations of almost any size    ACS 5-year estimates

•    American Community Survey 1-, 3-, and 5-year estimates are period estimates, which means they represent the characteristics of the population and housing over a specific data collection period. Data are combined to produce 12 months, 36 months or 60 months of data. These are called 1-year, 3-year and 5-year data.

For more information visit http://www.census.gov/acs/www/ or contact our Data Services Staff.

 

Population Estimates Program

The U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates Program (PEP) produces estimates of the population for the United States, its states, counties, cities, and towns, as well as for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and its municipios. Demographic components of population change (births, deaths, and migration) are produced at the national, state, and county levels of geography. Additionally, housing unit estimates are produced for the nation, states, and counties.

These estimates are used in federal funding allocations, as survey controls, as denominators for vital rates and per capita time series, and as indicators of recent demographic changes. With each new release of annual estimates, the entire time series of estimates is revised for all years back to the last census. All previously published estimates are superseded and archived.

Population estimates for the Counties and Cities in the Bi-State Region can be found on the Data Portal at GreaterQCRegionData.org.

For more information visit http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html or contact our Data Services Staff.

Count Question Resolution

The Census Bureau established the 2010 Census Count Question Resolution (CQR) Program by which State, local and Tribal area elected officials may challenge their jurisdiction's 2010 Census counts.  All challenges must be received by the Census Bureau no later than June 1, 2013.  Bi-State staff can assist with these challenges.

Corrected Counts - If a challenge results in a change, the Census Bureau will issue official revised counts to the affected governments. These changes can be used by the governments for future programs that require official 2010 Census data. They will also be used to calculate subsequent population estimates for that community.

Corrected counts for jurisdictions in the Bi-State Region can be found on the Data Portal at GreaterQCRegionData.org.

For more information visit http://www.census.gov/2010census/about/cqr.php or contact our Data Services staff.

Special Census Program

The Special Census is a program for local and tribal governments to conduct censuses for their communities in the years between decennial censuses.  When local officials believe there has been a significant population change in their community due to growth or annexation, they may choose to conduct a Special Census. The Census Bureau conducts Special Censuses on a cost-reimbursable basis. This means that the governmental unit requesting a Special Census assumes full responsibility for the cost of the Special Census. The updated information provided by a Special Census is designated as Official Census Statistics and may be used in any manner provided for by applicable law. The Official Census statistics produced by conducting a Special Census may produce an increase in state revenue sharing or other benefits. This could also offset the cost of actually conducting the Special Census, but much depends on the individual state's laws or regulations.  For more information visit http://www.census.gov/regions/specialcensus/ or contact our Data Services Staff.

Boundary and Annexation Survey

The U.S. Census Bureau conducts the Boundary and Annexation Survey (BAS) annually to collect information about selected legally defined geographic areas. Notices are sent to the Highest Elected Official and/or BAS contact in local jurisdictions each December.  The BAS is used to update information about the legal boundaries and names of all governmental units in the United States. The Census Bureau uses the boundary information collected in the BAS to tabulate data for the decennial and economic censuses, and annual estimates and surveys such as the Population Estimates Program and the American Community Survey.

pdf  census-bas-info-handout.pdf (61.44 kB)

NOTICE:  2014 BAS Program Suspended

The U. S. Census Bureau has suspended the Boundary and Annexation Survey (BAS) for fiscal year (FY) 2014, which runs from October 1, 2013 to September 30, 2014.  We are hoping the program will resume again for 2015 – watch for information on this in November or December of 2014. All governmental units in the Bi-State Region received correspondence from the U.S. Census Bureau in late October 2013 regarding the suspension.
 
For more information visit http://www.census.gov/geo/partnerships/bas.html or contact our Data Services Staff.

Commuting (Journey to Work) Survey

There are several surveys conducted by the Census Bureau that ask questions related to commuting including means of transportation, time of departure, mean travel time to work, vehicles available, distance traveled, and expenses associated with commuting.  Commuting (Journey to Work) refers to a worker’s travel from home to work.  The U.S. Census Bureau released updated County-to-County Commuting Flow data in early March 2013.  The data is based on information collected in the 2006 – 2010 American Community Survey, five year estimates.  Place of work refers to the geographic location of the worker’s job. A worker is defined as a person 16 years old and over, who were employed and at work during a reference period.

The pdf map and table summarize the commuting flow data for the Bi-State Region. For more information visit http://www.census.gov/hhes/commuting or contact our Data Services Staff.

EEO (Equal Employment Opportunity) Special Tabulation

The Equal Employment Opportunity Special (EEO) Tabulation is a special tabulation of data that highlights the diversity of the labor force.  The latest tabulation is based on the American Community Survey (ACS) 2006-2010 five-year data (www.census.gov/acs) and became available November 29, 2012 through American FactFinder (AFF) (factfinder2.census.gov).  This 107-table tabulation is produced by the Census Bureau for four sponsoring Federal agencies: Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), Department of Justice (DOJ), the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) at the Department of Labor (DOL), and Office of Personnel Management (OPM). The EEO Tabulation serves as the primary external benchmark for comparing the race, ethnicity, and sex composition of an organization's internal workforce, and the analogous external labor market, within a specified geography and job category.

The EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) contains information similar to comparable tabulations from the 1970, 1980, 1990 and 2000 censuses. Characteristics include sex, race, and Hispanic origin, cross tabulated by citizenship, occupation, industry, age, educational attainment, earnings, and unemployment status. The 2010 Census occupation categories used in this file are based on the 2010 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) categories. Tables are tabulated for at least one of three geographic types: residence, worksite, and residence-to-worksite commuting flows. These are tabulated for one or more of the following geographic summary levels: U.S. Total, all states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, metro and micro areas, counties, places, and EEO county sets. All tables also include estimates, percentages, and margins of error.

To access the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) tables go to http://www.census.gov/people/eeotabulation/data/eeotables20062010.html.

For more information visit http://www.census.gov/people/eeotabulation/ or contact our Data Services Staff.